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The brightness and energy of x-ray beams are critical properties for research. Higher brightness means more x-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot, allowing researchers to gather more data in greater detail in less time. Higher energies allow x-rays to penetrate deeper inside materials to reveal crucial information about a material’s structure and function. The combination of high brightness and high energy allows the observation and imaging — in real time — of fast and ultrafast technologically important processes, including fuel sprays, magnetic switching, and biological processes in living organisms.

The APS Upgrade project will increase the brightness of the APS high-energy (hard) x-ray beams. This will equip researchers for the groundbreaking discoveries and transformational innovations that create new products and industries and generate jobs.

In April 2010, the DOE identified the national need for the APS Upgrade (APS-U) project by approving Critical Decision 0, authorizing development of a conceptual design. In September 2011, the Director of the DOE Office of Science gave his approval for Critical Decision 1, formally approving the alternative selection and cost range for the project, establishing the preliminary technical scope, and authorizing a detailed preliminary design and initial research and development. The completed project will increase the number of users and experiments that can be accommodated by the APS, and the brightness of the x-ray beams at the APS.

APS Upgrade News

Early Experiments with the Upgraded APS Workshop series

May 13, 2015

APS will hold a series of Science Planning workshops in May and early June to identify some of the highest-impact early science opportunities that will be enabled by the APS Upgrade.

The Science Planning workshops are organized along disciplinary lines and will be led by prominent scientists in each field. The dates and topics for the workshops are as follows:

The workshops are part of the APS Upgrade’s Science Planning Process, which is being co-organized by Stephen Streiffer and Paul Evans. We expect these workshops to culminate in a report, Early Science at an Upgraded Advanced Photon Source, to be published early this summer. The report will help us document the Upgrade’s most exciting scientific opportunities and map out the high-level technical requirements necessary to pursue them.

More information is available on the workshops website. We look forward to hearing your thoughts, concerns, and ideas as we work together to make sure we are on track to achieve the user community’s highest possible scientific objectives with this Upgrade.